Tag Archive | weather

Snow in March

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For the second time this year, we have laying snow here in North Devon, and very pretty it is too. Thick enough to completely cover the grass on the unmown, shaggy lawns, it has turned the garden into a winter wonderland.

 

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Icicles drip from every overhang, and the sheltered side of every tree trunk is plastered with layer of snow.

 

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The poor spring bulbs have had a bit of a shock…

 

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The larger daffodil varieties are looking particularly sad, but the small ones such as Tete a Tete are coping better, poking bravely through the snow.

 

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My big drift of snake’s head fritillaries was about to burst into flower, and it will be interesting to see how they respond to being snow-covered.

 

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The camellia is still flowering profusely, but the current crop of flowers may well go soft and mushy when they defrost. They do best when sheltered from the morning sun from the east…if the flowers defrost slowly, they are less likely to suffer.

 

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This Corylopsis is looking particularly fine, with the snow as a backdrop.

 

 

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Many shrubs have started to produce their spring leaves, such as this red-leaved Spirea. I hope they don’t get too cold!

 

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Some native flowers will cope fine, such as this little primrose, tucked on the sheltered side of the garden wall.

 

 

 

 

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And the gorse on the hill is flowering well, as it does all year round.

 

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The spring catkins will also be unconcerned by a bit of snow.

 

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Last summer’s seedheads look particularly fine against a white carpet.

 

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So it may be cold, and difficult to drive around, but there is no better time to go explore the garden!

 

 

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A bit of August Weather

We are having a spot of interesting weather, and it has made all the grockles (holidaymakers) disappear like magic.

 

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Normally, this end of Woolacombe Beach  on a Saturday afternoon is a seething mass of humanity. Today, just a few hardy folk walking their dogs.

 

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It was very pleasant and peaceful, but less good for swimming…red flags, killer surf, nasty currents, you get the picture.

 

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We were looking forward to seeing the sand castle this guy was building, until we realised he was helping make a protective sand bank in front of the beach huts before tonight’s very high tide. Maybe he will put little crenelations along his protective wall!!

Gotta love August weather…

 

 

After the storm

Storm Imogen hit the South West pretty hard yesterday. The wind was very strong, and then it got stronger, and the odd gust was ridiculously strong. We postponed our shopping trip which would have involved two high bridges over the Taw and the Torridge, and it was a good thing we did, as both were closed later in the day. Instead we stayed inside worrying about the huge beech trees which tower over our drive. The cars were moved to safety, but in fact, only small twigs fell.

Further down the garden we were not so lucky.

 

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The top of a large sycamore fell, and broke off two other branches on the way down. Ah well, more wood for next winter’s fires.

The wind also tore the door off the old blue summerhouse, spreading broken glass over the garden. Another thing to be replaced when funds allow. We knew it was rotting, and wouldn’t last long, but had really hoped it would have survived this year.

Then, to finish the day off nicely, at about 4pm the power went off, to our village and two neighbouring ones, with at least 6 hours estimated for fixing it. Sigh…

The wind was starting to ease a little, so we drove to the coast to see the state of the sea, from a safe distance, I might add. It was difficult holding the camera steady, so the pics are not good, but the sea was very impressive with a huge swell, lots of white breakers, and foam everywhere.

 

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We then joined most of the population of the affected villages in the fish and chip shops of Braunton for our dinner. Never have they seen so many customers on a Monday in winter! We dawdled over our dishes, making the most of the warmth and light, then returned to our cold and dark house. A merry blaze in the woodburner soon took the chill off the living room, and we lit all our candles and chatted for a couple of hours. Then it was downstairs for a chilly night’s sleep. The power came back on during the night, and the freezer shows no signs of defrosting, which is a bonus. The house took a while to warm up today, not aided by a stream of short, sharp hailstorms, and even some snow.

 

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Even though we are 4 miles inland, our windows are now covered with a layer of salt! Roll on Spring, this is getting boring now…