Tag Archive | Corylopsis

Snow in March

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For the second time this year, we have laying snow here in North Devon, and very pretty it is too. Thick enough to completely cover the grass on the unmown, shaggy lawns, it has turned the garden into a winter wonderland.

 

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Icicles drip from every overhang, and the sheltered side of every tree trunk is plastered with layer of snow.

 

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The poor spring bulbs have had a bit of a shock…

 

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The larger daffodil varieties are looking particularly sad, but the small ones such as Tete a Tete are coping better, poking bravely through the snow.

 

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My big drift of snake’s head fritillaries was about to burst into flower, and it will be interesting to see how they respond to being snow-covered.

 

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The camellia is still flowering profusely, but the current crop of flowers may well go soft and mushy when they defrost. They do best when sheltered from the morning sun from the east…if the flowers defrost slowly, they are less likely to suffer.

 

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This Corylopsis is looking particularly fine, with the snow as a backdrop.

 

 

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Many shrubs have started to produce their spring leaves, such as this red-leaved Spirea. I hope they don’t get too cold!

 

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Some native flowers will cope fine, such as this little primrose, tucked on the sheltered side of the garden wall.

 

 

 

 

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And the gorse on the hill is flowering well, as it does all year round.

 

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The spring catkins will also be unconcerned by a bit of snow.

 

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Last summer’s seedheads look particularly fine against a white carpet.

 

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So it may be cold, and difficult to drive around, but there is no better time to go explore the garden!

 

 

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What a beautiful Autumn!

Devon is just glorious at the moment. Every day I wake to blue skies, sunshine, gentle breezes, and gorgeous autumn colours. The leaves are late with their colour this year, as it has been so mild, but we have had one or two nights with a touch of frost, and gradually the greens are turning to yellows, oranges and reds. But that is not the only colour change going on. My hydrangeas are all changing too. The clear blue flowers are ageing to deep, dusky pinks. The purple flowers are now a lovely wine red, and my white paniculata variety is a pretty strawberry pink.

 

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My dwarf pampas grass obviously liked the extreme haircut that I gave it this spring, as it has come back with a lovely collection of flowers.

 

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My favourite spring shrub, Corylopsis, is looking great in autumn too, with a lovely show of buttery yellow leaves.

 

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I have been working hard in the garden, digging out and levelling a new path. So for a bit of light relief I put a new edge on my new rose border. This is how I get a smooth curve on a border, by using a hose to lay it out first.

 

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Result – a nice neat curve. Just a couple of miles of border edge to go…

 

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We stopped for a coffee break this morning, and sat out in the garden and just listened to the peace and quiet. Coal tits were quietly wittering away in the tree above us and ravens flew overhead with their deep kronks. And then a peregrine flew over, checking out the garden for prey. Fabulous! I love my garden!

 

 

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A garden of surprises

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Our garden is full of surprises at the moment, delighting us with something new every week. We still have masses of daffodils of many types, and they are standing up to the weather now, so I don’t have to go round and rescue the flattened ones. I am still picking a bunch for the kitchen though, as there are just so many that the garden won’t miss them. I have found a clump of pretty peachy trumpets.

 

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And on the front lawn is one clump of double daffs – not my favourite type, but it is good to have the variety

 

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The crocuses are also doing really well with the improvement in the weather.

 

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Some of our mystery deciduous shrubs have burst into bloom. One small shrub with a very elegant, delicate shape has shown itself to be a Corylopsis, and is covered in creamy bells. Beautiful!

 

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Another large shrub has revealed itself as a flowering currant, which is a shrub that I always like to have in a garden, so that is great news. The flowers are still not fully open, but are a superb colour.

 

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We have added yet another mammal to our garden list, as a badger ran across in front of the car the other evening, and up our steps into the garden. It was exciting, as I can count on one hand the number of badgers I have ever seen, but it is a mixed blessing as they can be destructive, and I don’t really need anything else digging holes in the garden! The rabbits are bad enough – this is supposed to be my herb bed, right  by the kitchen door, and a big fat doe dug a massive burrow before we could stop her…

 

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We have filled it in. Grrr. There is also signs of nibbling on one of my new plants, so I have caged it with twigs, and will see if that deters them.

 

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I have finally seen the deer in the garden during daylight, with a herd of seven grazing on the lawn late one afternoon. I have excellent views, but by the time I had fetched the camera they had boinged over the fence and were staring at me from next doors field.

 

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I still have many bulbs yet to flower, and shrubs whose identities I cannot decipher from their twigs, so the garden has plenty more surprises for us to discover. What will tomorrow bring?

 

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